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Natura e moto dei cieli visibili secondo Giovanni Battista Riccioli. Analisi di Almagestum Novum, vol. II, lib. IX, sect. I e II

digital Natura e moto dei cieli visibili secondo Giovanni
Battista Riccioli. Analisi di Almagestum Novum, vol. II, lib. IX, sect. I e II
Article
journal RIVISTA DI FILOSOFIA NEO-SCOLASTICA
issue RIVISTA DI FILOSOFIA NEO-SCOLASTICA - 2018 - 1-2
title Natura e moto dei cieli visibili secondo Giovanni Battista Riccioli. Analisi di Almagestum Novum, vol. II, lib. IX, sect. I e II
author
publisher Vita e Pensiero
format Article | Pdf
online since 04-2018
doi 10.26350/001050_000051
issn 00356247 (print) | 18277926 (digital)
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In Section I, book IX of his Almagestum novum (1651), Giovanni Battista Riccioli (1598-1691) investigates the nature of the astronomical heavens. He asks whether the heavens are made of one kind of matter or of several. He argues that the planets move in a fluid medium but that the eighth and last sphere is made of frozen water. Comets disclose the corruptibility in the heavens which, on the whole, are incorruptible. How is this possible? Riccioli believes that the solution lies in considering the heavens as ab intrinseco corruptibiles, and ab extrinseco incorruptibiles. In the next Section of book IX, Riccioli examines the cause of heavenly motion, and he argues, in interesting detail, that the most likely hypothesis is that celestial bodies are moved by angels, whose agency we shall never completely understand.

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Giovanni Battista Riccioli, Heavenly Motion, Celestial Matter, Angels

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